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bullet Joanna Murry BEE was born on 14 Oct 1828 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. She died on 14 Jan 1913 in Grover, Lincoln Co., Wyoming. Parents: George BEE and Janet AITCHESON.

She was married to Arthur Pendry WELCHMAN on 8 Oct 1860 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah.


bulletJohn BEE was born on 6 Sep 1806 in Dalkeith, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. He died in 1875. Parents: William BEE and Johanna MURRAY.


bullet John BEE was born on 22 Jun 1714 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: James BEE and Margaret YEOMAN .


bullet Jonet BEE Parents: James BEE and Marion HARRET.


bullet Katherine BEE Parents: James BEE and Marion HARRET.


bullet Margaret BEE was born on 27 Mar 1731 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: James BEE and Mary Or Marion KELLIE.


bullet Marion BEE was born on 23 May 1701 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: James BEE and Margaret YEOMAN .


bullet Mary BEE was born on 16 May 1808 in Dalkeith, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Johanna MURRAY.


bullet Mary BEE Parents: James BEE and Marion HARRET.


bullet Mary BEE was born on 19 Jan 1765 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Ann FALCONER .


bullet Patrick BEE was born on 1 Aug 1728 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: James BEE and Mary Or Marion KELLIE.


bullet Richard John Moxey BEE was born on 6 Feb 1835 in Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. He died on 18 Jul 1912 in Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., Idaho.
Richard John Moxey Bee was born the 6th day of February, 1835 to George and Janet Atchinson Bee. He left his native land of Scotland as a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints arriving in the valley of the Great Salt Lake in the Henry W. Miller company of 1852. The following is his story of experiences during the early days:

In the spring of 1858 that remarkable exodus of the Mormons from the city and all the settlements north took place. I took an active part as I was living in Lehi and all those living south of the city were called upon to assist those of northern settlements unable to move themselves, to move south. I made several trips to Farmington, 16 miles north of Salt Lake, and to other places, and to all spectators, they might have seen a motley crowd of people and all kinds of conveyances, on the road continually night and day till the country was depopulated. Most of the exiles settled temporarily on what was known as Provo Bench, on the shores of Utah Lake, awaiting the decision of the "treaty." Peace was finally restored and in due time all returned to their former homes.

In the fall of 1858 I got a job freighting from a man who had the contract to furnish supplies for a company of soldiers, and provender for 500 mules the army was wintering in Sanpete valley, at Fort Ephraim. I sold him my teams of horses to be paid for the following February, and then hired him to drive the horses all winter freighting between Salt Lake and Fort Ephraim one hundred and twenty-five miles from the city.

I made regular trips during the winter till the latter part of January, 1859. When, on my last trip I reached Nephi at the mouth of Salt Creek Canyon, I was advised to stop a few days, as a family traveling up the canyon had been murdered by marauding Indians two days previous. I remained at Nephi three days and then I determined to make a start for Fort Ephraim thirty miles further as it had commenced snowing and I was afraid of being blockaded. The people remonstrated but being three or four days later than usual, I knew those in Sanpete would be uneasy regarding me. I started alone during a severe snowstorm with a heavy load and reached the last hill in the canyon before reaching the divide; had to shovel my way up to the top, then proceed over a seven mile divide. It snowed two feet while traveling that distance. It was then dark. I had a tired team and about given out myself. I could not travel any further having the road to break. I unhitched and tied the team to the wagon and fed them, then crawled into the wagon and sat up, being unable to have a fire, till the moon rose about midnight. I had still about 20 miles to travel with the Sanpete river between me and my destination. It was rather an uninviting and lonesome trip, being in the night during below zero weather and no one near provided I might need help.

I kept traveling as best I could, snow nearly to the wagon hubs. Finally I reached the river, which I had to ford. The ice extended 6 or 7 feet from the banks on either side and the water up to the horses' bellies. I made the attempt to cross after breaking the ice to allow the team and wagon to enter the water. My team was so jaded and thirsty, being without water all day before and to the present time, that when I got in the stream I could not urge them forward. They drank to excess, and when they got through, I started a few feet then struck the ice on the opposite bank. The team plunged so trying to climb the ice but could not make it. I then walked to the tongue, ax in hand, got off as best I could and chopped away for the horses and wagon. The horses, not being shod, they could not climb Out. I then walked back to the tongue of the wagon, unhitched them, calculating to go on to Fort Ephraim for help. It was just dawning day and yet nine or ten miles before I could reach the Fort, and I would have to keep on the move to keep from freezing, being wet nearly all over. While looking anxiously toward the settlement I perceived a dark object moving toward me. It proved to be a searching party sent to ascertain if anything had befallen me as I was about a week overdue. At last there approached six men, including my employer, with four horses and a sled. They saw me stalled in the river, the horses stiff with water, foundering, and myself nearly frozen. However, we were all thankful that things were no worse, and the lost one found. All hands started to unload, having some plank with them, we constructed a gangway between the shore and the wagon, and soon had the goods transferred to the sled. Then the wagon was pulled out and my team hitched. The four horses were hitched to the loaded sled, and then we were ready for the return trip.

Mr. Leslie, my employer, kept a store in Fort Ephraim and beside furnishing forage and supplies for the soldiers and their mules did a flourishing business with the settlers all winter. During the intermediate times between trips, I assisted him in the store and kept books for him, for which he allowed me extra to pay my wage engagement, which was to be $40.00 a month and furnishings from October to February following. When February came we were all blocked in with snow and no outlet to Salt Lake Valley only by traveling 100 miles to the south and west of us out of our direct way. I was very anxious to get home, and after settling up our affairs all satisfactory, I began to make arrangement to start for home. It happened there was another man whose home was in Goshen, located at the southwest of Utah Lake, he, also, was anxious to get home to his family, so we agreed to both make a break and endeavor to get through by the old road if we could follow it. I sold my wagon I had been freighting with, bought a pony and saddle, and after all debts were paid I had a pretty good stake to start home with $475.00 in gold. At last we started and traveled down the valley, snow being only 10 or 12 inches deep, till we struck the divide, where we encountered snow to the depth of 3 to 5 feet. We then traveled single file, taking turns in going ahead. Our horses being stout and fresh we plunged through the snow very well; sometimes we got into hollows going nearly out of sight; but knowing the direction we wished to go, we [p.36] kept at it till we finally reached the summit, having traveled from Fort Ephraim 26 miles, then dark, and still had 4 or 5 miles to travel before reaching Nephi in Juab valley about 10 o'clock... After being lodged and cared for royally we were ready when morning came to proceed on our journey. My road led northward by Provo, but the other brother's led northwest.

It is known Richard had at least three wives. His 2nd wife was Georgina McKetchnie. Georgina also happened to be his older sister's daughter, in other words his niece. He married Georgina when he was 25 and she was 14.

Richard is our Third Great Granduncle. Georgina is our 2nd Great Grandaunt, and 3rd Great Grandaunt by marriage. Parents: George BEE and Janet AITCHESON.

He was married to Georginia MCKECHNIE on 7 Feb 1860 in Bountiful, Davis Co., Utah.

He was married to Mary MATHESON on 4 Nov 1856.

He was married to Mary Jane HEPWORTH on 13 Dec 1869 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah.


bullet Robert BEE was born on 13 Mar 1779 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Ann FALCONER .


bullet Thomas BEE was born on 26 Aug 1811 in Dalkeith, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. He died in 1873. Parents: William BEE and Johanna MURRAY.


bullet Thomas BEE was born on 11 May 1771 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Ann FALCONER .

He was married to Agnes STEVENSON on 29 May 1791.


bullet William BEE was born on 22 Aug 1801 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Johanna MURRAY.


bullet William BEE was born on 19 May 1743 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Parents: James BEE and Mary Or Marion KELLIE.

He was married to Ann FALCONER on 19 Jan 1763 in Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Children were: Mary BEE, David BEE, Thomas BEE, William BEE, Helen BEE, Robert BEE, James BEE.


bullet William BEE was born on 24 Oct 1773 in Inveresk, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. He died in Scotland. Parents: William BEE and Ann FALCONER.

He was married to Johanna MURRAY on 2 Mar 1799 in Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Children were: George BEE, William BEE, Allison BEE, Ann BEE, John BEE, Mary BEE, Thomas BEE, Joanna BEE, Isabella BEE.


bullet Elizabeth BEECHER

She was married to Joseph PARKER on 26 Apr 1749 in New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut.


bullet Louisa BEEMAN


bulletMary BEERS.

She was married to Joseph RICE in 1669.


bullet Adelaide BELCOURT was born in 1852 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She died on 2 Mar 1941. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bulletAleef BELCOURT was born in 1873 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. She died about 1880. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Alex BELCOURT was born in 1850 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION) .


bullet Alexis BELCOURT was born in 1827 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

He was married to Nancy ROWAN on 25 Sep 1848.


bullet Archange BELCOURT was born on 11 Jun 1840 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

She was married to J.B. MASKUTAPWAU on 5 Jan 1858.


bullet Arkansas BELCOURT was born in 1854 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION) .


bullet Daniel BELCOURT was born in 1856 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He died in 1914. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Elizabeth BELCOURT was born in 1828 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

She was married to Xavier PLANTE on 20 May 1845.


bullet Infant son BELCOURT was born in 1866 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. He died in 1866. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Jean Baptiste BELCOURT was born in 1821 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

He was married to Cecile KALLIOU on 3 Jan 1848.


bullet Joseph BELCOURT was born on 25 Nov 1823 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He was baptized in 1844. He died in Feb 1879 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He was a Fur Trapper. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

He was married to Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION) on 25 Feb 1846. Children were: Alex BELCOURT, Adelaide BELCOURT, Arkansas BELCOURT, Peter BELCOURT, Daniel BELCOURT, Veronique BELCOURT, Julian BELCOURT, Maris BELCOURT, Infant son BELCOURT, William (twin) BELCOURT, Mary (twin) BELCOURT, Aleef BELCOURT.


bullet Joseph BELCOURT

He was married to Catherine LIRONDELLE in 1818 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Joseph and Catherine were officially married on 4 Dec 1844, but had obviously been married according to the custom of the country since 1818. Children were: Julie BELCOURT , Jean Baptiste BELCOURT, Joseph BELCOURT, Mie Amable BELCOURT, Alexis BELCOURT, Elizabeth BELCOURT, Josette BELCOURT, Archange BELCOURT, Petit Jean BELCOURT.


bullet Josette BELCOURT was born in 1832 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

She was married to J.B. COURTEPATTE on 26 Dec 1849.


bullet Julian BELCOURT was born in 1861 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. He died in 1882. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Julie BELCOURT was born in 1819 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

She was married to Carlton THIBERT on 1 Jun 1842.


bullet Maris BELCOURT Photo was born on 15 Sep 1864 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. She died on 28 Aug 1941 in Great Falls, Cascade Co., Montana. She was also known as Marias.
Written by Etta Adelia Monroe Moody
Feb 5, 1957 at St. George, Utah

Maris Belcourt was born Sep 15, 1864 in Edmonton, Canada, Her Father Joseph Belcourt was born in Edmonton also about 1824. There he met Madeline Campion, a French Indian girl,who was born about 1828 in Edmonton, Canada. when Joseph asked Madeline to marry him she told him she would not until he cut off his long black hair, so he did. He had a younger brother who had such long auburn hair that hung below his knees that he was so proud of that Mother never knew if he ever did cut it off. Carlos, Wallace and Hilda Monroe got their lovely auburn hair from the Belcourt side,

Uncle would tease the Indians as they wanted to scalp him for his long beautiful auburn hair, He would take his canoe and cross the Frazier River to the opposite side where the Indiana were camped. He would hide his canoe then go down the river bank wbers the Indians could see him. He would then take down his long hair, unbraid it and comb it out, run up and down the river bank with his beautiful hair flowing behind him. He was a very fast runner and no Indian could ever out run and catch him. When the Indians would see him they would howl and yell, get into their canoes, cross the river and try to catch him, He would run like a deer, get his canoe where he had cached it and away he would go. Grandpa Joseph and folks would warn him if he didn't quit teasing the Indians they would catch and scalp him, but they never did.

When Mother was 8 years old, she and her brothers and sisters took smallpox. They had received word that a band of Indians from Montana were an their way to Edmonton, and had been exposed to smallpox and for all the people to get vaccinated, Some of the families who got it last was the Belcourt Family and the vaccine had not taken effect when the Indians got there. They had just started to break out and were burning up with fever, The poor Indians would go into the Frazier River to cool off and they would come out and die like flies by the hundreds on the river bank, So many dying they couldn't bury their dead.

Peter, who was 18 years old, was out hunting buffalo an the prairie when he came down with the smallpox, and was too sick to ride hone, So one of his companions took word to Grandma Belcourt so she went to him. She was a good nurse and herb doctor, but she couldn't save Peter as he was too far gone when she got to him, She said if she had had him home she could have saved him like she did all the rest of her children, She had saved Uncle Daniel who had the black smallpox which was far more deadlier than the red smallpox,

Mother and none of her brothers and sisters ever learned to read or write. Grandpa Belcourt wasn't a poor man as he had cattle and horses and raised all their vegetables and made all their maple syrup, also pigs and chickens. And in those days all the buffalo, elk, moose, deer for wild meat and all kinds of birds and fruit,

Grandpa helped build the Catholic church and school in Ednonton, anf bought what few books that could be had in those days for his children, Mother said when she raised her little hand to ask the Sister to tell her what the word was in her reader the teacher would hit her hand hard with a ruler, No children learned to read or write only those who they wanted to make Priests and Sisters, All the others were just taught their Catholic Catachism by heart and no more. Why didn't Grandpa and Grandma Belcourt teach their children to read and write? My idea is, because they had such a large family and worked so hard to care for them they just didn't have time, Grandpa Belcourt wasn't allowed to sit in any of the pews in church because he refused to pay for it when he had given so much and helped to build the church and school, so he stood up in church.

When Mother was about eleven years old her baby sister Alief who was 5 was burned to death. Her dress caught on fire from a camp fire and all her clothes were burned off of her and also her hair, She never cried as she told them she had no pain. The Angels had come for her and she died with a smile on her face.

Grandpa Belcourt wasn't very old when he died the first part of February 1879. Mother thought it could have been tuberculosis as he got so weak, and it could have been heart trouble also. He was only 55. Grandma Belcourt died the last of February 1879 -- the same month. Mother said she was so swollen for months, and that sounds like a heart condition that goes into Dropsy. So Mother was left an orphan at the age of 15. She went to live with her sister Verona Simmons. Mother had such long hair that was below her knees and she wore it in two long braids. Her hair was very thick and she couldn't comb it herself. Aunt Verona said it was too much trouble to take care of herself so she cut it off short. Mother said there was only one girl who had longer hair which reached to her knees.

Uncle John and Aunt Verona Simmons decided to make a trip to the United States the same year their parents died. They came upon a battle between two large Indian Tribes, that they camped on a hill covered with brush and trees. So fierce was the battle their war cries and yells so terrifying they could be heard for miles. They were there for days and didn't dare light a fire or make any noise. They fixed their horses so they couldn't make ariy noise. One day an Indian scout who happened to be of the victorious tribe was scouting around to find any of the Indians of the other tribe to kill, and came upon the Simmons Camp. Luckily Aunt Verona could speak this Indians tongue and that is what saved their lives. He warned them to keep out of sight because the Tribe who had lost the battle had lost their Chief and they were in a madden rage and would kill any one they came upon no matter who they were. When the Indian Chief was killed the crying and lamenting of that tribe was just terrible. When the Indians had left and it was safe they went on their way and camped at Fort Macleod. Mother met Colonel McCloud and wife there and went to work for them for room and board. They tad 2 little girls and had started to teach Mother to read and write andi give her an education when they moved to Fort Benton, Montana. Mother met Dad at Fort Benton when she was 18 years old and they were married Oct.l, 1882. When Carlos was born June 23, 1883 in Fort Benton Mrs. McCloud had a baby boy and not enough milk so the baby was starving to death. Mrs. McCloud came to Mother and begged her to nurse her baby and save him. She did as she had enough for 2 babies. She paid Mother but I forgot what she paid her. Then in the summer of l881, when Carlos was a year old, Mother and Dad moved to Willow Creek 25 miles west of Choteau in a covered wagon. It took them a week to make the trip. Dad took up a homestead and built a log house in the summer of 1884, which stands today and is in good shape (Sept. 10, 1956). Eight of the Monroe children where born there. The second winter they were there was one of the hardest winters that was known in Montana history. I was only a little baby, and that winter the snow was up to 5 feet deep. The terrible blizzards and freezing weather killed thousands of cattle and sheep, starving and freezing them to death. It wiped out many wealthy cattle and sheep men. Mr. Collins told Dad if he could find any of his cattle he could have them, Dad took his sleigh and looked and found two cows alive. He had enough hay as he only had 2 horses to feed, so that is now Dad and Mother got started in the cattle business.

Mother was a wonderful woman to raise a family of ten children, making all of our clothes, even our stockings. I never had a boughten dress until I was 11 yrs. old. Mother grew big gardens and all the help she got was from what we little kids could help her. All Dad did towards the garden was to plow and rake it and put in the potatoes with us kids helping and digging them. Mother was a marvelous cook, anrl known as the best cook around the country and in Choteau, where she all alone put on big dance dinners for 100 people.

Our meadow was full of large wild strawberries. Sesi~es she put up gallons of wild gooseberry jelly and jams, wild rassberries, blueberries, ctockcherry jelly, and jam and buffalo berries, savorous berries, wild currents, red, yellow and black wild Oregon grapes, and wild rose berry jam. Mother was a wonderful companion with her children and always took us with her berry picking, and how we loved it,

Mother would sit by the kitchen stove and the stove would be red hot as the hard white pine wood made such good red coals that would give light through the long slide damper in front. All of us kids would sit close to her and how snug and warm the log cabin was with snow deep and freezing cold outside, Mother would tell stories of her girlhood days, sing songs to us in the Cree language,

Another time when I was about 15 or 16, Dad was thrown from a bronco, and was unconscious for 17 days. 3r. Brooks, our family doctor, never expected him to ever come to. He had a bruised skull fracture.

I never forgot the trip to Lethbridge, Canada. Mother had to go to Canada to get her Canadian Script as it was called before it was outlawed as she was entitled to so much land or money. She choose the money which was $500.00. Dad, Mother, her 'two brothers, and their wives and children, none had more than 1, 2 or 3 children, and we went in a big wagon with about 11 people (6 grownups and 5 children). This was the fall of 1891 -- Christian Eve was the baby. How long it took us I do not remember but no doubt a month or more.

When we got to Lethbridge we saw an Indian camp and a squaw nursing a big girl who looked to be 5 or 6 years old. Mother said she was that old as she talked Cree to them. That was where Archie and I was baptized by a Catholic Priest. I can see Archie as plainly, he was not 3 years old and so chubby and scared I held on tight to his little hand. When the Priest poured water on our heads the water ran down our faces and Archie started to cry. I told him not to cry and be afraid. How dearly I loved my baby brother and that picture is so clear in my mind to this day after 65-1/2 years as I was only 5 years at that time.

Maris is our Great Grandmother Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).

She was married to Carlton Leroy MONROE on 1 Oct 1882 in Fort Benton, Choteau Co., Montana. Children were: Carlos Lloyd MONROE, Etta Adelia MONROE, Archie Harmon MONROE, Christian Eve MONROE, Silas Leslie MONROE, Wallace Wesley MONROE, Hylda Maria MONROE, Florence Bell MONROE, Francis Eugene MONROE, Ethel Margaret MONROE .


bullet Mary (twin) BELCOURT was born in 1870 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. She died in Dec 1910. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bulletMie Amable BELCOURT was born in 1825. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.

She was married to Jex. GLADEU on 22 Nov 1852.


bullet Peter BELCOURT was born in 1856 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He died in 1874. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Petit Jean BELCOURT was born on 11 Mar 1844 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Catherine LIRONDELLE.


bulletVeronique BELCOURT was born on 26 Jan 1860 in Lac Ste. Anne, Alberta. She was also known as Verona. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bulletWilliam (twin) BELCOURT was born in 1870 in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada. He died on 1 Jul 1947. Parents: Joseph BELCOURT and Magdeleine (Madeline) SAPIN (CAMPION).


bullet Mary BELDEN

She was married to John WAITE on 12 Feb 1702 in Hatfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts.


bullet John BELDING

He was married to Sarah WAITE in 1693 in Hatfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts.


bullet Sarah BELDING

She was married to Ebenezer MORTON on 22 Feb 1711 in Hatfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts.


bullet Hildeburge de BELESME was born about 975.

She was married to Aimon S. de. Children were: Robert S. de.


bullet Abraham BELGRAVE was born in 1569 in Stanstead, Sudbury, Suffolk, England. He died after 1591. Parents: John BELGRAVE and Joanna STRUTT.


bullet Barbara BELGRAVE was born in 1575 in Stanstead, Sudbury, Suffolk, England. She died in 1576 in Stanstead, Sudbury, Suffolk, England. Parents: John BELGRAVE and Joanna STRUTT.


bullet Barbara BELGRAVE was born in 1577 in Leverington, Isle Of Ely, Cambridge, England. She died on 17 Sep 1589 in Leverington, Isle Of Ely, Cambridge, England. Parents: John BELGRAVE and Joanna STRUTT.

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